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about 7 years ago, i found two of these chairs, both in quite a state of disrepair, sitting by a dumpster, driving through one of those neighborhoods where people’s houses cost upward of a million dollars, despite being just like the houses in my neighborhood.  that’s L.A. for you.  they’re not my favorite chairs of all times, but they have been sturdy and serviceable for all these years now, despite their ragged appearance.  since we didn’t buy them, and they’re really shabby, we have never been careful with them, rocking back in the chair & putting strain on its joinery, standing on them to reach up-high places, and occasionally using them as makeshift sawhorses.  they just keep on being great furniture.  i love it when the stuff you have that was free is way better than the things you paid for.  i also love old things, if that much isn’t clear, and i love making sketches of my favorite (or the most interesting) parts of these old things.

about 7 years ago, i found two of these chairs, both in quite a state of disrepair, sitting by a dumpster, driving through one of those neighborhoods where people’s houses cost upward of a million dollars, despite being just like the houses in my neighborhood.  that’s L.A. for you.  they’re not my favorite chairs of all times, but they have been sturdy and serviceable for all these years now, despite their ragged appearance.  since we didn’t buy them, and they’re really shabby, we have never been careful with them, rocking back in the chair & putting strain on its joinery, standing on them to reach up-high places, and occasionally using them as makeshift sawhorses.  they just keep on being great furniture.  i love it when the stuff you have that was free is way better than the things you paid for.  i also love old things, if that much isn’t clear, and i love making sketches of my favorite (or the most interesting) parts of these old things.

*1
i wasn’t trying to draw this in perspective.  i was just going for orthogonal, but screwed that up and got this wobbly bit of linework.  but you can pretty well tell what this old wooden dresser looks like that lives in my kitchen anyhow.  the front is curved, the handles are wood, and it’s all painted cream.  a couple of the keyholes are missing their escutcheons, but the lock is intact in all but one drawer.  it’s pretty old.  vintage or maybe antique by now.  sorta rickety and imperfect.  so the drawing is actually a good match!  ^__^

i wasn’t trying to draw this in perspective.  i was just going for orthogonal, but screwed that up and got this wobbly bit of linework.  but you can pretty well tell what this old wooden dresser looks like that lives in my kitchen anyhow.  the front is curved, the handles are wood, and it’s all painted cream.  a couple of the keyholes are missing their escutcheons, but the lock is intact in all but one drawer.  it’s pretty old.  vintage or maybe antique by now.  sorta rickety and imperfect.  so the drawing is actually a good match!  ^__^

drawing &/or painting glass is one of those skills i’ve always intended to develop, but never really put aside drawing time to do it.  thing is, i collect beautiful glass vessels (well, i think they’re beautiful, but they’re not fancy; i just like that apothecary look of bunches of bottles and jars full of things).  so i have plenty of stuff to practice drawing from.  and i just never do it.  i think part of that is that i would want to work in color, since a lot of my glassware is colored glass, or clear glass with colored objects inside.
this is one of those lorina french lemonade bottles, drawn with label still on.  the bottles are not only beautimus, btw—their contents are super delicious (every flavor i’ve tried)!!!  so i tried to capture the embossed emblem on the side of the bottle in this drawing, if you look at it and wonder what that mess is on the side.  i still have a long way to go before i can pull off drawing glass and have it be totally recognizable.  but i still don’t think this turned out too shabby, and it was excellent practice.  i’m sitting here staring at at “ATLAS MASON” jar right now with embossing on all 4 sides.  perhaps that will be my next glass-drawing challenge…

drawing &/or painting glass is one of those skills i’ve always intended to develop, but never really put aside drawing time to do it.  thing is, i collect beautiful glass vessels (well, i think they’re beautiful, but they’re not fancy; i just like that apothecary look of bunches of bottles and jars full of things).  so i have plenty of stuff to practice drawing from.  and i just never do it.  i think part of that is that i would want to work in color, since a lot of my glassware is colored glass, or clear glass with colored objects inside.

this is one of those lorina french lemonade bottles, drawn with label still on.  the bottles are not only beautimus, btw—their contents are super delicious (every flavor i’ve tried)!!!  so i tried to capture the embossed emblem on the side of the bottle in this drawing, if you look at it and wonder what that mess is on the side.  i still have a long way to go before i can pull off drawing glass and have it be totally recognizable.  but i still don’t think this turned out too shabby, and it was excellent practice.  i’m sitting here staring at at “ATLAS MASON” jar right now with embossing on all 4 sides.  perhaps that will be my next glass-drawing challenge…

*2
copic marker + copic multiliner.  unfinished.  this is the wife; i was drawing her while she played uncharted 3.  i’m planning to go over top of it with more copic marker and then over that with colored pencil.  one of these days (maybe).  ^__^

copic marker + copic multiliner.  unfinished.  this is the wife; i was drawing her while she played uncharted 3.  i’m planning to go over top of it with more copic marker and then over that with colored pencil.  one of these days (maybe).  ^__^

*2
we have since decided this is not the way we’re going to deal with the teeny bedroom, but i still really like the idea.  here’s what you’re seeing:
underneath the bed would be where we keep all of the clothes we don’t keep in the wardrobe (our house does not have a clothing closet).  the three sorta art nouveau tree design rectangles, those are drawers, for socks & underwear.  since the under-bed storage is mostly hidden out of view, we would also be able to keep boxes of stuff we don’t want in the attic, like halloween decorations or whatever.  the window seat next to the sewing station might have extended under the bed a ways since it would make rifling through our belongings easier than doing so hunched over.  our ceilings aren’t tall enough for us to lift the bed up, be able to walk upright underneath it, and then still have room to sit up in bed.
our new solution, we have finally decided, is going to involve busting out part of the ceiling into the attic (only 4’ high at its peak) so that we can put the bed higher (and in a different part of the room, so it’s in the center of the house for maximum height) and still be able to walk under the bed.  the sewing station will also be moved; out of the bedroom altogether.  it will stay in the office where it currently is.  and instead, amy’s writing desk (which we have not yet found or acquired) with her stationery supplies and the old typewriter (everything old, nothing even remotely modern) will go next to the window where, in this drawing, i’ve placed the sewing station.  the wardrobe may or may not remain a part of the bedroom.  it would also function nicely as a pantry (its original use, in fact), so maybe it’ll be a part of the kitchen remodel once we figure out a better storage solution for our clothes.

we have since decided this is not the way we’re going to deal with the teeny bedroom, but i still really like the idea.  here’s what you’re seeing:

underneath the bed would be where we keep all of the clothes we don’t keep in the wardrobe (our house does not have a clothing closet).  the three sorta art nouveau tree design rectangles, those are drawers, for socks & underwear.  since the under-bed storage is mostly hidden out of view, we would also be able to keep boxes of stuff we don’t want in the attic, like halloween decorations or whatever.  the window seat next to the sewing station might have extended under the bed a ways since it would make rifling through our belongings easier than doing so hunched over.  our ceilings aren’t tall enough for us to lift the bed up, be able to walk upright underneath it, and then still have room to sit up in bed.

our new solution, we have finally decided, is going to involve busting out part of the ceiling into the attic (only 4’ high at its peak) so that we can put the bed higher (and in a different part of the room, so it’s in the center of the house for maximum height) and still be able to walk under the bed.  the sewing station will also be moved; out of the bedroom altogether.  it will stay in the office where it currently is.  and instead, amy’s writing desk (which we have not yet found or acquired) with her stationery supplies and the old typewriter (everything old, nothing even remotely modern) will go next to the window where, in this drawing, i’ve placed the sewing station.  the wardrobe may or may not remain a part of the bedroom.  it would also function nicely as a pantry (its original use, in fact), so maybe it’ll be a part of the kitchen remodel once we figure out a better storage solution for our clothes.

*2
my favorite headphones of all times.  these were, sadly, stolen.  at least i sketched them before that happened.

my favorite headphones of all times.  these were, sadly, stolen.  at least i sketched them before that happened.

*4
life drawing practice, charcoal & white chalk on tone paper (~2 hrs).  need to do this more often.  i’m always surprised at how much more quickly i can draw with traditional media than doing almost anything at all on the computer (especially when starting from scratch).

life drawing practice, charcoal & white chalk on tone paper (~2 hrs).  need to do this more often.  i’m always surprised at how much more quickly i can draw with traditional media than doing almost anything at all on the computer (especially when starting from scratch).

here’s my animated creature drawn from various angles.  i designed it originally for the ‘egg rock' animation assignment, and then, later, we were asked to draw it from various angles (as in the image above) and then draw a 'walk cycle' animation from the characters we drew.

here’s my animated creature drawn from various angles.  i designed it originally for the ‘egg rock' animation assignment, and then, later, we were asked to draw it from various angles (as in the image above) and then draw a 'walk cycle' animation from the characters we drew.

*1
ok, so, i did this a few years back when i took an animation class.  it’s all drawn with pencil on animation paper, of my own creature.  the cool thing about animation paper is supposed to be that it has holes that allow you to line each image up perfectly while on the light table and also while photographing it later.  well, i never did get around to photographing it in my class.  i tried my best to line them up on the scanner correctly, but all the page corners were curled and bent and stuff… tried when importing to imageready to line them up where they weren’t perfect, but i didn’t quite get rid of all the jitter.
oh, also… like so many things that i leave unfinished… i started to do some tracing of the lines with colored pencil and a teeny bit of shading.  but about 5 cells into doing that, even on this exceptionally simple animation, i didn’t feel like finishing.  so, yeah.  these issues i will likely never fix.  i mean, if it took me this long to digitize it?  moving on to other things.  i’m content enough to have finally scanned it in and put it online.
coming soon now posted: walk cycle using same character.  still need to scan those pages.  (spoiler alert: same stumpy arms in walk cycle.  so bad.  i was being so lazy!)

ok, so, i did this a few years back when i took an animation class.  it’s all drawn with pencil on animation paper, of my own creature.  the cool thing about animation paper is supposed to be that it has holes that allow you to line each image up perfectly while on the light table and also while photographing it later.  well, i never did get around to photographing it in my class.  i tried my best to line them up on the scanner correctly, but all the page corners were curled and bent and stuff… tried when importing to imageready to line them up where they weren’t perfect, but i didn’t quite get rid of all the jitter.

oh, also… like so many things that i leave unfinished… i started to do some tracing of the lines with colored pencil and a teeny bit of shading.  but about 5 cells into doing that, even on this exceptionally simple animation, i didn’t feel like finishing.  so, yeah.  these issues i will likely never fix.  i mean, if it took me this long to digitize it?  moving on to other things.  i’m content enough to have finally scanned it in and put it online.

coming soon now posted: walk cycle using same character.  still need to scan those pages.  (spoiler alert: same stumpy arms in walk cycle.  so bad.  i was being so lazy!)

oil paint on shabby old wood slab.  i limited myself to 3 colors, no black or white.  i used winton (the cheaper line of winsor & newton) oil paints: phthalo blue, cadmium red medium, and cadmium yellow medium.  i tried not to take the darkest areas all the way to black, but to leave a bit of bluish tone for a lot of hue contrast.  another experiment i want to try is doing a rough-out of the values in acrylic paints, letting that dry, and then dealing with color exclusively on top of that, which will avoid the desaturation of color that can happen so quickly when you start mixing in blacks and whites.  also, if i get my lines crisp in acrylic, i can blend away to my heart’s content with the oil paint on top of it without worrying about lines that start to creep.
note: the painting is bigger than my scanner, so this is a cropped version of the painting, but despite its lack of clarity, it’s still better than the photo i’d taken of it in the past.  of course, now that i’ve found it, i’ll take a better photo one of these days.  but in case i forget, at least i’ve got this in the mean time.

oil paint on shabby old wood slab.  i limited myself to 3 colors, no black or white.  i used winton (the cheaper line of winsor & newton) oil paints: phthalo blue, cadmium red medium, and cadmium yellow medium.  i tried not to take the darkest areas all the way to black, but to leave a bit of bluish tone for a lot of hue contrast.  another experiment i want to try is doing a rough-out of the values in acrylic paints, letting that dry, and then dealing with color exclusively on top of that, which will avoid the desaturation of color that can happen so quickly when you start mixing in blacks and whites.  also, if i get my lines crisp in acrylic, i can blend away to my heart’s content with the oil paint on top of it without worrying about lines that start to creep.

note: the painting is bigger than my scanner, so this is a cropped version of the painting, but despite its lack of clarity, it’s still better than the photo i’d taken of it in the past.  of course, now that i’ve found it, i’ll take a better photo one of these days.  but in case i forget, at least i’ve got this in the mean time.

elevation of same built-in sofa.  i’m thinking of maybe putting a mattress underneath (guest bed) instead of individual drawers.

elevation of same built-in sofa. i’m thinking of maybe putting a mattress underneath (guest bed) instead of individual drawers.

here’s an example of a built-in couch i would love.  this is more or less to scale w/ our livingroom, but i didn’t do the windows justice.

here’s an example of a built-in couch i would love. this is more or less to scale w/ our livingroom, but i didn’t do the windows justice.

i want stickley-style built-in couches, but nothing that resembles a futon (this drawing is rather futon-y, but :P oh well)…  if it’s not clear what’s going on here, the tray is supposed to have folded out of that hollow in the arm.  the way it’s angled, it would be for holding a book, but if it was adjustable (which would be ideal) then it could also be used as a flat surface, for a plate of food or a sketchbook or somesuch.

i want stickley-style built-in couches, but nothing that resembles a futon (this drawing is rather futon-y, but :P oh well)…  if it’s not clear what’s going on here, the tray is supposed to have folded out of that hollow in the arm.  the way it’s angled, it would be for holding a book, but if it was adjustable (which would be ideal) then it could also be used as a flat surface, for a plate of food or a sketchbook or somesuch.

just a pen contour drawing of a robot w/ some hatched shading that i couldn’t stop myself from doing. will look better w/ colored pencil.  maybe one day i’ll get around to adding some…

just a pen contour drawing of a robot w/ some hatched shading that i couldn’t stop myself from doing. will look better w/ colored pencil.  maybe one day i’ll get around to adding some…

inspired by coey’s post.

inspired by coey’s post.